What We Do - Large

Spirasi is committed to developing best practice and contributing to the area of torture rehabilitation. Currently, Spirasi partners with Trinity Centre for Global Health (TCD) on several projects and the University of Ulster on one project relating to the CONTEXT research programme.

 

Logo for Trinity UniversityLogo for Ulster University

 

Current Research taking place in Spirasi includes:

  1. MEASURING THE PSYCHOSOCIAL VULNERABILITY OF NEWLY LANDED ASYLUM SEEKERS (2017 – 2020)

Doctoral researcher: CHRISTINA GLEESON

Objective: Develop and validate a psychosocial vulnerability screening tool for asylum seekers that can be used throughout the EU and assess how psychosocial vulnerabilities predict mental health outcomes.
Innovation: The newly developed scale will be freely available throughout the EU, will provide practitioners a method of triaging psychologically vulnerable asylum seekers entering the EU, and will provide a validated method of measuring changes in psychosocial vulnerability throughout the asylum process, contributing to our understanding of how vulnerability predicts later mental health outcomes.

 

  1. INTERGENERATIONAL TRAUMA AMONG REFUGEES: PREVENTING THE TRANSMISSION OF TRAUMA FROM PARENT TO CHILD (2017 – 2020)

Doctoral Researcher: NATALIE FLANAGAN

Objective: Explore how parent-child communication can inhibit the intergenerational transmission of trauma-based psychological distress.
Innovation: Explore the specific parent-child mechanisms that prevent or exacerbate the transmission of trauma-related distress from parent to child. Recommendations will be made to directly inform current treatment programmes of individuals who have a history of torture and who have been recently reunited with their children.

 

  1. COMPLEX PTSD AMONG ASYLUM SEEKERS AND REFUGEES WHO ARE VICTIMS OF SEXUAL VIOLENCE (2017-2020)

Doctoral Researcher: RACHEL FROST

Objective: Assess the validity of Complex PTSD among asylum seeking and refugee populations who have experienced sexual violence and identify key etiological factors for the development of Complex PTSD.
Innovation: Will contribute critical evidence to the on-going WHO developments for Complex PTSD as a unique diagnostic entity, while also identifying key factors that lead to its development. Will also yield innovative screening tools and targeted treatment options for refugees and asylum seekers exposed to sexual violence.

For more information on the 3 research projects above please visit: http://www.psychotraumanetwork.com

 

  1. MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES OF ASYLUM SEEKERS AND REFUGEES WHO HAVE EXPERIENCED TORTURE: AN EVALUATION OF SPIRASI’S REHABILITATION SERVICES (2018 – 2021)

Doctoral Research: AISLING HEARNS

Objective: Assess the validity of Complex PTSD and the use of the International trauma Questionnaire (ITQ) among victims of torture and evaluate the rehabilitation services for victims of torture in Spirasi.
Innovation: Will establish an appropriate diagnostic category and tool for the assessment of the psychological impact of torture. Will inform best practice and effectiveness of rehabilitation services. Findings will be disseminated on an international level in order to establish a uniform approach toward treatment for victims of torture worldwide.